Through a FOIA request to the Maryland Racing Commission, I have confirmed the following kills at that state’s tracks thus far this year. (Because the details, including vet testimony, are so powerful – and damning – I will post in multiple installments so as to give each death its proper due.)

Military Commander, Jun 6, Pimlico R
“Left front fetlock dropped to ground. Open fracture, [separate] comminuted fracture, significant soft tissue disruption. Fragment came through the skin after the horse was placed in kimzey splint and allowed to bear on limb to load on ambo.”

Kens Lady, Jun 20, Pimlico R
“LF fetlock open disarticulation with fracture…euthanized on the track.”

Sweet Sassafrassy, Jun 20, Pimlico R
“The hind legs of Kens Lady clipped her front legs out from under her causing her to fall. Comminuted fracture of scapula.”

Through a FOIA request to the Maryland Racing Commission, I have confirmed the following kills at that state’s tracks thus far this year. (Because the details, including vet testimony, are so powerful – and damning – I will post in multiple installments so as to give each death its proper due.)

Vern H, May 13, Pimlico R
“The horse appeared to take a bad step. The horse took several more strides and then collapsed…catastrophic injury to the right front shoulder…euthanized on the track.”

Da Chrome, May 29, Pimlico R
“Broke down just past 5/16 pole…believed to have an open [through the skin] fracture of left front ankle…. The horse was euthanized off [italics added] the track.” Also: “The right lip fold is lacerated and the overlying skin is missing deep into the dermis. There is blood coming from the nostrils and the skin around the right eye has…hemorrhage. The skin of the scrotum is also partially missing. Severe ulcers [in] stomach.”

Da Chrome was just three years old. This poor, poor boy.

Silver Sun, Jun 26, Timonium S (scheduled to be raced that day at Pimlico)
“The gelding was tied to the stall wall ready to come to the races. While the connections went to get the trailer, the horse flipped…suffer[ing] acute brain trauma.”

Through a FOIA request to the Maryland Racing Commission, I have confirmed the following kills at that state’s tracks thus far this year. (Because the details, including vet testimony, are so powerful – and damning – I will post in multiple installments so as to give each death its proper due.)

R Bs Rod, Apr 3, Laurel T (euthanized Apr 24)
“The horse returned from galloping lame – tibial fracture. [Three weeks later], private vet reported fracture had displaced…euthanized.”

Dr. Daniel (commission vet): “The goal was to keep the horse up for several weeks to allow the limb and fracture to stabilize…. At some point, apparently the ‘High Line’ broke and the colt laid down. Sadly, the fracture became much worse when he attempted to get back up. At this point, euthanasia was the humane option.”

Also, R Bs Rod, two, suffered from “chronic ulcers in the stomach,” “[some] chronic degenerative joint disease,” and “early laminitis – separation of laminae – [in three of the four] hooves.” Again, two years old. Bastards.

Friesian Days, Apr 13, Laurel S
“Trainer and horse were in barn preparing to go to the track. Trainer threw rider onto the horse and the horse reared up and started backing up. The horse then backed into the annex shed, striking its head on the wall and then flipping. The horse was then able to get outside of the barn and collapsed to the ground…unable to rise again or move back legs. [I]njuries were so severe – vertebral and brain trauma with spinal cord and brain hemorrhages/compressions – that the horse [was] euthanized.”

Then this: “History of a fracture in LH leg after a head trauma over 1 year ago, per owner.” And: “There is noted chronic degenerative joint disease in three of the four legs [and] subacute hemorrhage/ulcers in stomach.”

So, that’s two “head traumas,” the second fatal, in a little over a year; a prior fractured leg; “chronic degenerative joint disease”; and “hemorrhage/ulcers in stomach.” Friesian Days was just three years old.

Escapability, Apr 13, Laurel T
“Horse broke down near the finish line: [multiple] open [through the skin], complete, displaced fractures.”

Also: “Chronic degenerative joint disease in all four pastern and fetlock joints…most severe in front limbs.” And (of course): “stomach ulcers.” Escapability was two years old.

Through a FOIA request to the Maryland Racing Commission, I have confirmed the following kills at that state’s tracks thus far this year. (Because the details, including vet testimony, are so powerful – and damning – I will post in multiple installments so as to give each death its proper due.)

Holly Blame, Mar 29, Laurel S
“The horse developed an infection in his left front foot…treated for six months, with several medications. The horse started to bleed…and then developed laminitis. Euthanized due to the severity of laminitis with 10 degrees of rotation.”

Dr. Daniel (commission vet): “My concern with this situation is that this is the second horse from this trainer’s barn that has had to be euthanized under the same circumstances. I have suggested to his treating veterinarians that [Jose] Corrales and his help may need educating on proper foot care.”

Imagine that: a professional racehorse trainer “may need educating on proper foot care.”

Scoreswhenhewants, Mar 30, Laurel T
“When the horse reached the quarter pole, [he] broke down: complete, comminuted fracture, [numerous] fragments; extensive muscle damage and hemorrhage. Degenerative joint disease [all four limbs].”

Scores had just turned five. He also, by the way, had had prior surgery – in same limb that broke down – with three metal pins inserted.

Dreamingofsavannah, Apr 3, Laurel T
“Filly was toward the end of her breeze when she broke down. The left tibia is shattered…numerous fragments. There is acute hemorrhage in both [italics added] hind limbs. The acute traumatic damage to the RH fetlock joint and surrounding tendons is very interesting; we wonder if that damage might have occurred a step or two prior to the catastrophic step(s) that resulted in the tibial fracture.”

Also: “There is chronic degenerative joint disease in both left and right radiocarpal joints and in all four fetlock joints.” And: “Chronic ulcers in squamous mucosa [stomach] and acute stress ulcers in glandular mucosa.”

Dreaming was just three years old and had yet to be raced (i.e., all that “chronic joint disease” was strictly the result of training).