Guanabenz is an antihypertensive drug – used to treat high blood pressure. In horseracing, it is a Class B, the second most serious kind. With that in mind, I give you the following recent rulings from the New Mexico Racing Commission:

On Aug 13, trainer Aurelio Valdez’s horse Reining Pesos tested positive for Guanabenz after winning the 2nd race at Albuquerque.

On Aug 13 (yes, same day), trainer Aurelio Valdez’s horse Oh Gollie tested positive for Guanabenz after winning the 5th race at Albuquerque.

On Aug 13 (yes, same day), trainer Aurelio Valdez’s horse Tobleronne tested positive for Guanabenz after finishing 2nd in the 6th race at Albuquerque.

On Aug 13 (yes, same day), trainer Aurelio Valdez’s horse Jes Charge N Go tested positive for Guanabenz after winning the 7th race at Albuquerque.

On Aug 13 (yes, same day), trainer Aurelio Valdez’s horse Mr Racy Perry tested positive for Guanabenz after winning the 10th race at Albuquerque.

On Aug 20, trainer Aurelio Valdez’s horse Deputy’s Echo tested positive for Guanabenz after finishing 2nd in the 4th race at Albuquerque.

On Aug 20 (yes, same day), trainer Aurelio Valdez’s horse El Tarasco 727 tested positive for Guanabenz after finishing 6th in the 6th race at Albuquerque.

On Aug 26, trainer Aurelio Valdez’s horse Royal Queen tested positive for Guanabenz after finishing 3rd in the 1st race at Albuquerque.

To recap: Aurelio Valdez doped eight different horses over just three days. Eight horses. Three days. Oh, and then there was this: Valdez went into this flurry of criminality – yes, this is animal cruelty according to NM law: “negligently mistreating…or tormenting an animal” – with two prior Class B’s over the past year and was already suspended till April of next year. Now, it’s September 2038. On the surface, 16 years appears strong, and apologists will argue that this will in effect end his career. But, I must ask: Why just “in effect”? Why will this reprobate even have a chance of training horses again? What exactly does it take for someone to lose his license in this state, in this industry? These questions are, of course, rhetorical.

Pistachio Princess, four, suffered what the CHRB is calling “sudden death” at Los Alamitos yesterday. While they’re filing it as non-track-related, Pistachio had a timed workout Saturday. No matter, it’s an industry kill either way.

Also, and belatedly, the CHRB says Dub Town succumbed to colic last Wednesday at Golden Gate. He was six years old and had been put to the whip 29 times.

Chart notes from U.S. Thoroughbred and Quarterhorse races last week.

Golani Brigade “in distress, euthanized on track” at Finger Lakes
Trinity Titoli “in distress, euthanized on track” at Finger Lakes
O’Brien “bled” at Parx
Free Chickens “vanned off” at Aqueduct
Ever Summer “fell, DNF” at Aqueduct
Tuesday Too “fell, DNF” at Charles Town
Ravens Reflection “vanned off” at Delta
North Caucasus “vanned off” at Gulfstream
Curlin’s Coleen “bled” at Gulfstream
Stormy Lass “collapsed and died after the wire” at Aqueduct
Mariah’s Princess “bled, vanned off” at Churchill
Pcr Flashin the Cash “bled, vanned off” at Turf
Tommys Diamond “vanned off” at Zia
Biondi “vanned off” at Aqueduct
Bobs Blues Man “vanned off” at Del Mar
Declare Mr Perry “vanned off” at Los Alamitos
Too Chatty “bled, vanned off” at Zia

While not all the “vanned off” end up dead, most do, as borne out by our subsequent reporting. “Bled,” “Returned Bleeding From Nostrils”: pulmonary hemorrhage.