Wyoming: 22 Horsemen/Track Employees Fined for “Failing to Fully Disclose Their Arrest Histories”

Last week, the Wyoming Gaming Commission made a rulings dump for the past year. Amid a slew of drug violations – mephentermine, phentermine, clenbuterol, albuterol, et al. – various incidents of “obscene language,” connections skipping out on the post-race urine test for their winning horse (wonder why), and one trainer knocking another out cold on the backside (though this happened in 2021), there were these:

“Jockey Larren Delorme failed to fully disclose his history of arrests.” $100 fine.

“Owner/trainer Travis Offert failed to fully disclose his arrest history.” $50 fine.

“Owner/trainer Jeff Womochil failed to fully disclose his arrest history.” $50 fine.

“Owner Danielle Hansen failed to fully disclose her arrest history.” $50 fine.

“Owner Jose Garcia failed to fully disclose his arrest history.” $50 fine.

“Owner/trainer Justin Clark failed to fully disclose his arrest history.” $50 fine.

“Owner Brock Jones failed to fully disclose his arrest history.” $50 fine.

“Owner Robert Dahle failed to fully disclose his arrest history.” $50 fine.

“Owner/trainer Mac Hansen failed to fully disclose his arrest history.” $50 fine.

“Owner Trenton Woods failed to fully disclose his arrest history.” $50 fine.

“Owner John Five failed to disclose any and all arrests and/or convictions.” $50 fine.

“Jockey Joe Dominguez failed to fully disclose his arrest history.” $50 fine.

“Permittee Employee Richard Tabura failed to fully disclose his arrest history.” $50 fine.

“Groom Buff Williams failed to fully disclose his arrest history.” $50 fine.

“Owner Saul Mendoza failed to fully disclose his arrest history.” $50 fine.

“Owner/trainer Michael Martin failed to fully disclose his arrest history.” $50 fine.

“Vet Assistant Timothy Rhinehart failed to fully disclose his arrest history.” $50 fine.

“Assistant starter Travis Waddoups failed to fully disclose his arrest history.” $50 fine.

“Jockey Jose Guzman failed to disclose any and all arrests and/or convictions.” $50 fine.

“Trainer Jamie Ducheneaux failed to disclose any and all arrests and/or convictions.” $50 fine.

“Trainer Uriel Dominguez Sr. failed to disclose a prior conviction.” $50 fine.

“Gail Bunce failed to disclose a conviction.” $50 fine.

That’s 22 separate people who work with horses failing to disclose their arrest histories. And that’s just in one (small, for racing) state. What more can I add?

And finally, this: “Pony Rider Brittani Richins struck the racehorse she was leading in the post parade of the 6th race on June 4 over the head.” $50 fine.

10 Comments

  1. Having a criminal record is not the problem. The problem is not disclosing the information about having a criminal record. Pay the fine. You’re good to go. No problem. This is horseracing and horse abusing and horse doping and horse killing. No problem as long as there is money in it. This is the disgusting modus operandi of the people in this industry.

  2. Makes me think of the whole chicken/egg debate: Do those with criminal tendencies flock to horse racing? Or does involvement in horse racing make one a criminal?
    Either way, law enforcement in Wyoming stays awfully busy with the Sport of Kings crowd;)

  3. I cannot believe such people are HIRED working with, and along side, Horses — how frequently do these CRIMES occur? — heartbreaking for the Horses — one way or another, they get hurt at every turn — SHUT DOWN Horseracing.

    • Many of these people listed above own horses and, allegedly, the owners “pay the bills” in horseracing, so I have heard several years ago. It was on a broadcast on either ABC or NBC when they were airing the hoopla surrounding a Grade One level race and, more or less, putting the owners on a pedestal of sorts. Of course, Wyoming is a long ways away from being anywhere near a Grade One level.

  4. unsavory business filled with ex criminals. the horses dont stand a chance with these low lifes imo

  5. The amounts of these fines are pathetic. The fines are obviously not deterring these miscreants from breaking the rules. Nominal fines are one of the horseracing industry’s hallmarks.

    • Probaby because they are training for the Racing Commissioners who provide immunity to their trainers while throwing the book at anybody who is not training for them.
      The racing commissioners usually work with their HBPA cohorts to control the entire stable area and the activities therein.
      The corruption runs deep, but they still get their $350+ million per year in casino subsidies no matter how rotten they are nor how many racehorses they kill.

  6. And, this, in no better way can it be said, is why I left this business, for good.

    I was never a horse owner, trainer, vet, or racing insider, but I was a gambler. And a regular one. But without the wagering, including mine and all the rest, there is no industry, in spite of all the subsidies that are piled on to it.

    They lost my business, for sure.

    It took me a while, but oh, I found out, it is crooked, from top to bottom, from the cheapest claiming tracks to the apple of racing’s eye, the Kentucky Derby, it is the worst gambling game in the world. Because, of all the gaming options that abound today, it seems to be the only one that gets away with rampant, overt, blatant cheating – on a regular basis.

    I do not wish to make light, nor overlook the horrific abuse of the horses, which, as I can now see, takes place on a daily basis, but it seems that all other legal gaming options, casinos, state-run lotteries, sports betting, on-line apps, have to abide by rules that insure that their game is conducted honestly.

    Not horse racing.

    I don’t know how long this industry can continue to flout the law like this, with it’s doubled-edged sword of cheating and animal abuse, but my guess is that it’s day is coming. The closure of more and more tracks, and, the impossibility of the industry to support itself on its own will undoubtedly contribute to its ultimate demise, sooner or later.

    Yes, I once thought that racing could be fixed, conducted honestly, and safely to all concerned- including, of course, the horses. However, I have since come to the opinion that, no, it cannot be fixed- not now, not ever, when the “inmates are running the asylum”.

    -Joe

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