5-year-old Gingerbred Girl’s last place finish in a $5,000 claiming race Saturday at Suffolk Downs was described thus:

“Gingerbred Girl trailed, lost contact with the field before the half-mile pole and was put to strong right-handed whipping to the final furlong while steadily getting further behind.”

To repeat, she trailed and lost contact with the field before receiving a “strong right-handed whipping,” a whipping, by the way, that bore no fruit – Gingerbred finished 44 1/4 lengths back. 5th place in this race, the best jockey Rigo Sarmiento could hope for, was worth $270. Mr. Sarmiento should be arrested for animal abuse.

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Gingerbred Girl has only been raced five other times. Follows are four of those:

7/28/12, last of 11 – trainer/owner David Wallace
6/16/13, 13th of 14 – trainer/owner Charles Bell
6/27/13 (11 days after 13th-place finish), 6th of 7, 30 3/4 lengths back – Bell
7/14/14, last of 8 – Bell

An open question to Art Sherman, Perry Martin, Steve Coburn, the 100,000 fans in attendance, the millions more watching around the world, indeed, all who were seduced by NBC’s shameful coverage: How to explain, justify, defend this?

(pick up around 2:50 mark; California Chrome has the white stripe)

3-year-old California Chrome received roughly 20 hard lashes within 15 seconds. Said celebrated jockey Victor Espinoza: “I noticed something as soon as he came out of the gate. He was not the same. By the 5/8ths pole he was just empty.” So, he beat him – mercilessly, while the horse ran on an open wound (below). In truth, Mr. Espinoza should be arrested for animal cruelty under Section 353 of NY’s Ag and Markets Law: “A person who overdrives, overloads, tortures or cruelly beats…any animal, whether wild or tame, and whether belonging to himself or to another…is guilty of a class A misdemeanor…” Anything, racing apologists?

photo credit: AP
photo credit: AP

From this week’s Santa Anita Stewards Report:

(5/22/14) EDWIN OROZCO was in the office this morning in response to a complaint filed against him for his actions on a difficult horse during training hours yesterday. According to Safety Steward LUIS JAUREGUI, word was received from the outriders that Mr. Orozco used the strap end of his belt on the horse WAR ACADEMY, which had “frozen” at the finish line in the middle of the track and refused to move.

The exercise rider, who took over riding the horse after it injured another rider two weeks ago, admitted that he did use his belt, but stated he did not have a whip and given the horse’s position on the track he felt that the issue of safety outweighed using the belt. He also said that one of the morning outriders attempted to help him, but to no avail. In retrospect, Orozco realizes he made a mistake, but says he was attempting to diffuse a potentially dangerous situation.

Horses, the apologists say, are born to run, love to run; the modern Thoroughbred is the most exquisite of athletes, sleek and powerful, with, most importantly, an instinctive will to compete. Ignore, they continue, the diminutive humans perched atop, for both the jocks and their snapping appendages serve merely as guides. In short, you can’t force a racehorse (or any horse) to do something he doesn’t wish to do.

It matters not whether the above springs from conditioned naivete or deliberate dishonesty. It’s pure, unadulterated bunk. Of course horses are compelled to race, a compulsion that often ends in calamity. Witness Sunday’s 1st race at Fair Grounds, when a 3-year-old named Sweet Basil suffered the following under the guiding Richard Eramia:

After gaining “under a right-handed whip in upper stretch, [she was] switched to a left-handed whip outside the sixteenth-pole, drew alongside the winner late and just missed then pulled up in heat distress and was vanned off.” Whipped with both hands, heat distress, ambulanced off. Chasing – for her jockey and “connections” – a $41,000 purse. The athlete as slave. That is the racehorse.

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From the UK comes word that 10-year-old Thoroughbred Mad Moose (below) has been “banned” by the British Horseracing Authority for, as Horse & Hound (1/13/14) puts it, “being reluctant and refusing to race one too many times.” In his last race in December, he started but “[pulled] himself up” before the first hurdle, the seventh time in 14 months that he has refused to participate. Horse & Hound adds, “The horse even got Nigel in trouble with the BHA last November, after the trainer chased after him waving a belt to try and get him to start at Cheltenham.”

mad moose jumps the last on his way to winning at cheltenham 19-4-12

While British media is having a bit of fun with this – calling him “quirky,” “naughty,” “headstrong,” and “serial” – I see something different. For me, this is a tale of quiet yet resolute rebellion, an exploited animal saying, in the only way he can, ‘no more.’ No more will I be whipped into doing your bidding. No more will I risk my limbs for your game. No more. Odds are, Mad Moose will soon be dead anyway, for there can be little value in an “old” (comparable to a twentysomething human) gelding who won’t run. But for now, this is one track event worthy of applause. And for that, Mad Moose, we thank you.