Two Horses Crumple at Belterra

According to the chart for the 8th at Belterra yesterday, 3-year-old Justourluck “went wrong into the turn, fell and was vanned off.” While I’ve yet to get a firm confirmation, that language almost invariably means dead. Here is the video; note that even with a (likely fatally) injured horse lying in the dirt, the “Winner’s Circle” party carried on. (Another horse, Devilish Tail, also went down – “fell over the stricken rival”; I will, of course, follow up on him, too.)

8 Comments

  1. So painful to watch these poor horses fall and be “vanned” off (whatever that means) so everyone watching can continue to have a good ego-centered victory. It just hurts my heart that is crying for the SLAVES driven to their destruction by humans who have no conscience awareness of what they are doing. Who was it that said: “Forgive them, father for they know not what they do.”? I know it wasn’t a fan of horse racing.

    • Jesus said that in the New Testament, Christine Stanley. I think most of the people that have been in the racing industry for more than a year know what they are doing. I think most of the people in horseracing are evil, sadistic psychopathic sociopaths that enjoy the abuse, brutality and cruelty that they inflict upon horses. They should be arrested and put in jail for animal abuse and killing horses by sadistic abuse!!!!! There are people that have been in the racing industry all of their lives and their father and grandfather were in it too. Ignorance (of the law) is no excuse (to break the law). These evil horse-killing degenerate people should be held accountable, not subsidized.

  2. It’s been reported that back in the 1970s such extensive doping and abuse didn’t exist or was rampant as it is now with owners not caring a fig about the health, welfare or lives of their horses. This has to stop along with disallowing horse racing in the first place.

  3. Chris1055, I would have to disagree with the doping not being as prevalent in the 70s. I’ve known quite a few old timers that have been racing since the early 70s. They used to joke that they “tried everything”. One said he used to run a really hyper horse on marijuana and he had one that was too laid back so he joked that he tried cocaine and all sorts of speedball and uppers combos.
    Another trainer admitted he used to do the milk shaking and had tried the cobra and toad venoms, and he laughed and said “hell I would’ve given them elephant piss if it helped them run better”. He then joked “I tried it all. Can’t really say anything worked consistently and if it would’ve I’d still be using it!” The practice of pin firing was developed in the early 80s, and a vet I know of was one of the first to develop that and encourage it. The last time I saw him he admitted that essentially that brutal procedure was useless so hundreds of thousands of horses have gone through that for nothing, and many of these goofballs still swear by it today. Much of the modern day treatments and doping that racehorses experience now are the result of experimentation in the 70s.

    • Marie, I don’t know when the practice of “pin-firing” started. I know that there were horses being pin-fired long before the 1980s. In the late 1960s (about 1969) I saw one Thoroughbred race horse stabled in North Lewiston (Idaho) that had been pin-fired. I had heard of it being done to racehorses, but I had never seen how it was done. It looks like it would be horribly painful with all of those little tiny holes in the hair and skin of the horse’s cannon bones.

      • Probably so, maybe he meant he had started it in this area and introduced it to the tracks here. It, and blistering, are both very painful.

  4. I have seen some of the ridiculous clothes and hats that the women with attitude wear to the horse races. This was shown on the news on TV. I think these outfits reflect the ignorant and sick personalities of the individuals who participate in this cruel sport. All those who are guilty and responsible for all the cruelty (men and women alike) should be held accountable by law.

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