Baby “Spooked, Bolts Into Rail,” Severs Artery, Dead

From the My Racehorse – “Affordable Race Horse Ownership” – website on 2-year-old Ancient Royalty:

“Tristan de Meric [bloodstock agent] at the farm informed us that when finishing up his morning gallop, Ancient Royalty spooked and bolted into the rail when another horse working close by him spooked and unseated the rider. Unfortunately, when bolting into the rail Ancient Royalty suffered deep lacerations and a severed artery to his left stifle and surrounding areas, causing significant blood loss.

“Tristan and the quick-acting staff at de Meric had Ancient Royalty on the van within 5 minutes of the accident and were transporting him to the equine hospital down the road for emergency surgery when Ancient Royalty succumbed to his injuries.”

Ancient was anything but: two (barely) years old and being prepped for his first race.

18 Comments

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  1. Almost a 2 year old – are you friggin serious – this baby deserved to still be at home not anywhere near a god damn race track or a training track. Jesus H Christ you assholes are pathetic beyond belief. Always the almighty dollar is all you ever see – none of this breeding info is needed – doesn’t matter – you simply took another life of a poor animal that never had a chance involved with any of you losers.

  2. So the quick-acting staff have a (another) dead baby Thoroughbred on their hands to answer for. I’ll bet the people who had to report this incident of dead ANCIENT ROYALTY (who spooked into the rail and bled to death from his injuries) did some “quick-acting” as well. This is part of the daily routine for this industry. Forcing a baby Thoroughbred to do what is FUNDAMENTALLY WRONG for any baby Thoroughbred to do; run and run fast while carrying the weight of the saddle and the rider.
    #endhorseracing

      • Nancy, I searched it online. Tristan de Meric Farms is in Ocala, FLORIDA. They are pinhookers. God knows how many baby Thoroughbreds they have ABUSED TO DEATH!!!!!
        #endhorseracing

        • Hi Wanda—
          Can you please explain what a “pinhooker” is?
          I found a sterile definition online. I suspect it was incomplete.

          • A “pinhooker” in horseracing is someone who trades in young racehorses for profit. They start these young Thoroughbreds under saddle at way too young of an age. Starting training at the age of 18-months-old is okay for just ground training and teaching commands and basic stuff. However, in the racing industry, they just want the horses to run and run fast while carrying a rider. Young horses are called yearlings at the age of 12 months. At 18 months, they are more or less called “long yearlings.” This age is way too young to be performing as an adult. To demand that a baby perform as an adult horse is the primary role of “pinhookers” besides the goal of selling the trained baby at a profit. This is a FUNDAMENTAL WRONG OF THE RACING INDUSTRY!!!! The Jockey Club is “okay” with exploiting Thoroughbreds to race at 2-years-old. It is NOT okay in true horsemanship. The pinhookers are looking to buy young underdeveloped yearlings, “train” them to race, prep them for a race and/or a sale where these inherently abused babies are forced to run as fast as they can possibly run. Since Thoroughbreds are considered to have a “universal birthday” of January 1st, some of these babies might not even be two-years-old yet, depending on what month/day of their actual birthday.

        • When I saw the term “pinhooker” I immediately thought of pinworm, another type of parasite, and just as disgusting.

  3. Poor baby, it is such bullshit what happens to these babies.
    On another note, the Dam of Maximum security passed away while giving birth to her 2nd baby to her current stable. She was 14 years old. I saw another passed during birth at age 20. When the hell do we let these horses retire? Oh wait they never do until they are dead or slaughtered. Sickens me.

    • Autumn..I saw that announcement also. Sounds like the baby girl made it,but that leaves an orphaned foal in need of a surrogate. Another hellish reality of this business.

    • Oh, but don’t worry.. the official statement said “it was a beautiful curlin filly”. So in other words..who cares.

  4. Perfect example of how the “MyRacehorse” phenomenon is actually BAD for the whole, super-secretive industry. Like Wanda alluded to above, these incidents take the lives of thousands of racehorses every year. Too bad they can’t be covered up as easily when the equine victim has dozens of “investors.”
    Those in this sick biz sure miss the days when a single owner (and trainer, and track, and racing commission…) got to huddle together anonymously as these daily “freak accidents” occurred; they kept most of ’em all hush-hush, so their own names wouldn’t fall under public scrutiny for horse killing. But it’s not so easy to hide, when all 50 of the poor horse’s owners have to be informed about the “little mishap” and its outcome, now, is it?
    MyRacehorse just puts a bunch more holes in the public information sieve that’s killing their whole gambling game:)

  5. “Bad step”, “spooked”, “bolted”. All the fault of the horse so nobody has to take responsibility. Sounds bad if they say “scared the hell out of a terrorized baby that fled for its life”.

  6. Of course it’s the horse’s fault. Damn horse didn’t appreciate the love of his handlers and now will miss out on that life of royalty we know all racehorses have. I’m sure the people at this first stop on the exploitation trail acted fast, as they saw all that potential money leaking into the dirt.
    Disgusting.

  7. Here’s enough evidence that horse racing is a very bad investment and not just because of the money. Here is evidence that horseracing itself is very bad!!!! I wonder if this tragedy will cause some of those investors, or at least one of them, to think twice about horseracing itself…?!
    ANCIENT ROYALTY was a victim of pinhookers and of horseracing itself! Hopefully more people will see this demented gambling game for what it is in reality.

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